Racism During The Great Depression – Was This a Real Problem?

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The United Independent Compensatory Code System Concept: a textbook workbook for thought, speech and or action for victims of racism white supremacy also known as the “The Code” by Neely Fuller Junior. This code was written to help victims of racism white supremacy to solve a problem of racism white supremacy. Neely Fuller also wrote a word guide to compliment his initial work.

He published his United Independent Compensatory Code System Concept a textbook, workbook for thought, speech and or action for victims of racism white supremacy in nineteen eighty four. His companion United Independent Compensatory Code System Concept: a compensatory counter racist codified word guide was first published in two thousand ten. His word guide is around four hundred and thirty pages in length.

Was there racism during the great depression? Was a new deal and other economic solutions at that time a formula for not allowing people of color to prosper back then and maybe into a future? Were people of color hit quite economically hard in comparison to white people?

Perhaps using Neely Fuller's two books could shed some color on what may have transpired during an alleged great depression. By going back and listening to past speeches, audios, lectures during that time frame might expose some clues. There are differing views about how long it occurred and when a great depression first began.

Segregation was still legal and prevelent during a great depression period in the United States of America. Allegedly, unemployment figures for people of color were quite a bit higher than for white people. Lynchings, beatings, and overall public persecution of non-whites was still occurring.

Do you think that racism was still a problem during a great depression? Do you think that using language skills to decipher racism during that time period would be beneficial?

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