Linguistic Studies – Are There Common Stupidities in English?

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Heron Stone from Gendo.net joined me in a discussion of linguistics. Heron covered five stupidities of the English language. He covered absolutism, dualism, reification, the word THE, and the verb to be.

Heron described examples of absolutism in the English language. Some examples of absolute words are all, everything, always, never, none, completely, etc. Using absolute generalizations can cause problems when discussing some subjects.

Another topic he covered was a theme of duality in language compared to nature. In nature two valued logic, which is basically what a duality exemplifies is not as common as one might think. Examples of a duality are Coke or Pepsi, Democrats or Republicans, legal or illegal, yes or no, etc.

What reification means and examples used in language was articulated. He described reification as basically a form of abstraction. Love, communism, democracy, politics, etc. are examples of reification.

Heron talked about how commonly used the word THE is in the English language. He gave examples of when and when not to use the word THE. An example of the used improperly is pointing out a green chair as the chair when there are more then one chair in close proximity.

Another common stupidity of the English language is how the verb to be is used. Again Heron described proper sentence structure to replace this commonly misused verb. To be as a verb is quite ambiguous and general.

There are other stupidities of the English language, but these five can cause problems during discussions. I personally have encountered and been a part of arguments when language is used in this manner. Also, to me some speakers can put people in language trances purposely when using these concepts.

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